4.13. How to build the world

Last updated 2 February 2016 for Self 4.6.0

Should you need to reconstruct a world from the source files, here’s how to do it. This section describes how to create a default object world by reading in the Self source code distributed through the GitHub repository. You can also do this after writing the world out using the transporter (transporter fileOut fileOutAll).

4.13.1. From within the main Self tree

To create the default object world, change your current working directory to the objects subdirectory of the Self source release and follow these steps:

  1. Start the Self VM:

    % Self
    Self Virtual Machine Version 4.1.13, Sat 04 Jan 14 12:17:37 Mac OS X i386 (4.4-268-g58a0717)
    Copyright 1989-2003: The Self Group (type _Credits for credits)
  2. (Optional, but recommended.) Start the spy so you can watch the world fill up with objects:

    VM# _Spy: true


    You must use the primitive to do this because the world is empty.

  3. Read in the default world. To do this, ask Self to read expressions from a file:

    VM# 'worldBuilder.self' _RunScript

4.13.2. From outside the main tree

When developing applications which aren’t part of the main Self distribution, it is often convenient to build a Self world from a directory other than the default directory. You can specify on the command line where the main Self distribution is and the options. For example the below builds the world with morphic and also ui1. Use -o none to build without any graphics.

% Self -f /path/to/Self/objects/worldBuilder.self   \
       -b /path/to/Self/objects                     \
       -o morphic,ui1

4.13.3. Finishing the build

Once you have started the worldBuilder.self script, you will be given options as to which features you would like in your new world.

  1. Unless you have asked Self not to print script names, you should see something like:
Reading worldBuilder.self...
reading ./core/init.self...
reading ./core/allCore.self...
reading ./core/systemStructure.self...
. . .
  1. Unless you have specified the options on the command line, then at various places, you will be asked if you wish to add optional additions to the base system, such as the morphic user interface (UI2) or the earlier UI1 (which requires X11 to run):

    Load UI2 (Morphic)? (y/N)
    > y
  2. After all the files have been read in, Self will start the process scheduler, initialize its module cache, and print:

    “Self 0”

    That last line is the Self prompt indicating that the system is ready to read and evaluate expressions.

  3. If you have loaded Morphic, you may wish to open up a window:

    "Self 0" desktop open
    Adjusting VM for better UI2 performance:
    _MaxPICSize: 25
    The ui2 desktop is now running. Type:
    "desktop stop"  to suspend it,
    "desktop go"    to resume it after stopping, and
    "desktop close" to close it.
    "Self 1"